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Madagascar

Yearbook 1997

Madagascar. According to Countryaah, former military dictator Didier Ratsiraka, who ruled the country from 1975 to 1993, was named new president at the end of January after winning the presidential election at the end of December 1996. A new government was presented in April with Pascal Rakotomavo as prime minister.

1997 Madagascar

After allegations of violating the country's constitution, President Zafy resigned in September. In the subsequent presidential election, Didier Ratsiraka became the country's new president with 65% of the vote.

In 1997, the country's social and health situation deteriorated further. Diseases such as malaria increased their prevalence among the population, and according to. information from the United Nations Agricultural Organization FAO was three-quarters of the population malnourished.

In March 1998, a new constitution was passed by a referendum. It delegated greater powers of power to the president and delegated greater economic autonomy to the country's 6 provinces. Opposition association CFV boycotted the vote, accusing the government of having dictatorial intentions. Following the May parliamentary elections, Tantely Andranarivo was appointed prime minister in July. He replaced Pascal Rakotomavo, both members of AREMA.

In December 2000, provincial elections were held to give local authorities greater control over development, health and education programs, but the opposition called for a boycott, citing that voters had not been adequately informed about the election. 70% of the electorate stayed home and AREMA won in most cities except the capital where Marc Ravalomanana won. He was in poor condition, but through the sale of yogurt he had become rich and a politically charismatic leader.

Police used tear gas in the city of Antananarivo in February 2001 to disperse protesters trying to free Parliament Deputy President Jean-Eugene Voninahitsy, who had been jailed for offending Ratsiraka and for issuing coverless checks. After the capture of Voninahitsy, a bloc of opposition parties had been formed in parliament: the unit in defense of democracy in crisis. In May, after 29 years, the Senate was abolished, and the new constitution's institutions were in place: the presidential office, the National Assembly and the Constitutional Court.

Ravalomanana stood as a candidate for the presidential election in December, and the counting of votes had barely begun before he declared himself victorious, which should make another election unnecessary. But this was not accepted by Ratsiraka. In January, Ravalomanana and his supporters conducted a general strike in the capital and a series of protest demonstrations against what they characterized as Ratsiraka's manipulation of the election results.

 

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