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Ethiopia

Yearbook 1997

Ethiopia. Ethiopia made several attempts during the year to deal with his past. In January, more than 1,000 people were accused of participating in the terrorist campaigns ordered by the overthrown dictator Mengistu Haile Mariam during his reign. Above all, it was people from rival Marxist groups who were affected by the terror.

According to Countryaah, protests against the country's new land reform also occurred. The protests turned against the decision that the peasants who had been loyal to Mengistu and his regime should be deprived of land in favor of those who were oppressed by it.

The banknotes of the country were exchanged. Eritrea was included on the old banknotes on the national map and they were embellished by the old junta's emblems and slogans. The new banknotes have derived their motives from Ethiopian daily life.

1997 Ethiopia

In June 2007, the government expelled the International Red Cross (ICRC) of the Ogaden region. The Ogaden regional government accused the ICRC of not being neutral but allying itself with the local rebel movement. Ethiopia had by this time embarked on a bloody offensive against the local rebel movement for which the country did not want foreign observers. In an April 2009 report, Human Rights Watch accused the Western world of being strikingly silent about Ethiopia's bloody offensive in Ogaden, which included the burning of villages, rapes and murders.

In 2008, the Forum for Democratic Dialogue (Medrek on Amhari) was formed by 4 opposition parties. In February 2009, they were joined by the 4 largest opposition parties. The aim was to overthrow the TPLF government in the parliamentary elections in May 2010. The attempt failed. The ruling party got 499 out of the 536 seats in parliament, the opposition 2 and TPLF support parties took the remaining 35. The ruling party also won 1903 out of 1904 seats in the municipal councils. The opposition accused the government of widespread electoral fraud. African Union (AU) observers characterized the election as "free and fair," while EU observers sharply criticized the election process. Observers pointed out that the election result was a consequence of the high economic growth in the country (9.9% in 2009 and 7% in 2010) as well as the selective oppression of the opposition. The country's anti-terror legislation passed in 2009 was used to hit journalists and opposition members. In June 2011, the state banned 3 organizations: the Ogaden National Liberation Front (ONLF), the Oromo Liberation Front (OLF) and the opposition party Ginbot 7. All 3 were designated as terrorist organizations. For the rest of the year, members of the Oromo minority and its political organizations were subjected to more intense persecution. The regime also arrested the leading members of the opposition parties UDJ and ENDF. For the rest of the year, members of the Oromo minority and its political organizations were subjected to more intense persecution. The regime also arrested the leading members of the opposition parties UDJ and ENDF. For the rest of the year, members of the Oromo minority and its political organizations were subjected to more intense persecution. The regime also arrested the leading members of the opposition parties UDJ and ENDF.

The rainy season failed in 2011 - for the second year in a row. The worst drought in East Africa in 60 years was thus a reality.

 

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