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Bahrain

Yearbook 1997

Bahrain. In January, a consortium led by ABB (Asea Brown Boveri) received an order for a power plant and desalination plant in Bahrain, a project that is expected to be completed by the end of 1999. According to Countryaah, the part of the order that went to ABB was estimated to be worth around 2.1 SEK billion.

In late July, the human rights organization accused Human Rights Watch/Middle East Bahrain of routinely torturing incarcerated democracy advocates. However, the Bahrain government consistently denied any accusations that it sanctioned torture to quell the democratic opposition.

1997 Bahrain

In April 2012, Formula 1 runs on the Grand Prix track in Bahrain. Prior to that, the organizers had faced great international pressure to relocate to another country. The Grand Prix runs in Bahrain were seen as supporting the dictatorship. Also in Bahrain there were demonstrations against the race. February 14, the movement had scheduled 3 days of anger that coincided with the running of the race. They were mostly peaceful, but faced with the security forces' use of tear gas, sound bombs and warning shots, some protesters again responded with gasoline bombs.

In June 2012, the authorities brought an 11-year-old boy to justice for "disturbance of public order" and "call for unrest". At the same time, police continued their assaults on protesters. The EU kept a low profile, and largely failed to criticize the regime in Bahrain.

In September, a scandal broke out in the United States when it was revealed that a CNN broadcast about Bahrain's serious human rights violations made by journalist Gleen Greenwald and photographer Amber Lyon would not be brought. The scandal was not so much that the broadcast was not brought, but at the same time it was revealed that Bahrain paid CNN to bring only "positive" news about the country. At the same time, it was revealed that Georgia and Kazakhstan also paid CNN to bring only uncritical news.

In October, the government banned all demonstrations. How it felt it differed from previous months in which demonstrations were also banned and met with violence by authorities not clear.

The following month, the authorities deprived 31 Bahraini nationals of their citizenship, claiming they had "damaged the security of the state".

At the end of September 2013, 50 people - including human rights activists - were sentenced to 5-15 years in prison on security charges. The convicted could subsequently report that they had been subjected to torture.

Demonstrations against the dictatorship continued throughout 2013. Inspired by the Tamarod movement that brought Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi to a fall in June, the Bahrain protest movement convened demonstrations on August 14, the 40th anniversary of the country's independence. It happened under the slogan of Bahrain's Tamarod. The day also marked the 2 year anniversary of the start of the protests. The Ministry of the Interior warned against "illegal demonstrations and activities that would jeopardize security" and escalated security forces' actions. Still, the protests continued. A local human rights organization reported 745 protest actions in December alone. The authorities responded with arrests - among other things. of 31 children, house searches and disappearances.

During a demonstration conducted by Shiites in the village of Daih near Manama in March 2014, a bomb fired, killing 3 policemen and wounding a fourth. 25 were arrested as suspects of the explosion, and at the same time the government met which decided to characterize the protest movements and their sympathizers terrorists.

 

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